What camera is this ?

Discussion in 'Photoshop & Artwork Section' started by flying_pumpkin_88, Feb 21, 2011.

  1. flying_pumpkin_88

    flying_pumpkin_88 Well-Known Member

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    hey guys !

    i've been looking for a vintage film cameras and came across the one Bosco was holding in his "盡快愛" mv. Does anyone noe the brand/model of this cam? or if it even exist?

    also, any recommendation on vintage looking cams that produces light leak effects other than the diana series and the Holga ?

    thanks millions in advance =D
     
  2. BestOffer

    BestOffer Well-Known Member

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    could be a Leica camera? i know they do have vintage look on them and they could be expensive OR tvb being cheap on some random Minota film camera...
     
  3. MrCooperS

    MrCooperS Well-Known Member

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    Could be anything. But if your looking into vintage cameras, play around with a Holga :)
     
  4. tang92

    tang92 New Member

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    Could be anything
     
  5. miniaznray

    miniaznray Active Member

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    from the looks of it, it's those old film rangefinders. the light effect u talking, r u talking about bokeh meaning blur in japanese. Vintage looking camera i would say Olympus Pen. Micro Four third is very popular in japan,hong kong, and korea now. You should look in to it. M43 cameras have the ability to use vintage lens that are 30-50 years ago.
     
  6. ralphrepo

    ralphrepo Well-Known Member

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    Argus C3, at one time the best selling American made 35mm camera. I actually had one a long time ago, LOL... You can probably still get a working one on ebay or Amazon for about $50 USD.

    [​IMG]
     
    #6 ralphrepo, Mar 13, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2011
  7. ralphrepo

    ralphrepo Well-Known Member

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    BTW, if you're looking into light leaking cameras for visual effect, I suggest you do the effects in software instead. Often, the light leak patterns of these old plastic cameras require persistent usage in order to get used to them and to anticipate what the final product would look like. That is, you're going to waste a lot of film (which I'm assuming that you're still developing the old fashion way), time and money, before you arrive at an effect that you like. Further, the light leak pattern of your particular vintage plastic beast may not be to your overall satisfaction. That is, these things don't all leak the same way or to the same degree. You may not like yours and have to get another one. It's really a hit and miss type of deal. Of course, if you're a "purist" for some sort of quasi-artsy religious reason, then there's no stopping you; be forewarned, but be my guest.

    Additionally, carrying real physical film is not an easy thing. I remember back in 1991 lugging over 600 rolls of 35mm AND 120 film (B&W, Color and Infrared) to China, and processing all the B&W stuff every night in makeshift darkrooms. I would have, as the saying goes, spat out rice in answering had there been a digital alternative. <_<

    But, I can certainly appreciate the allure of history. So good luck with the nostalgia (Y)